No Harbour Lights

No Harbour Lights

Phylis Jones writes from life: her book ‘They Gave Me a Lamp’ told of her time working in a medical centre with the National Coal Board, and has recently been re-published.'No Harbour Lights' tells of her first experience of the nursing world, the story of a young nurse during World War two.
Here is another wonderfully evocative account of an era long gone, not so much in years but in terms of attitudes and certainties. A vivid, highly personal portrait of, one fears, a vanished Cornish community with its extended family values, its quiet tragedies and yet its enormous relish for life. It is a portrait seen through the eyes of the young author as she sets about her nursing training at the outbreak of World War Two.
Phyllis Jones writes of a seemingly unsophisticated yet amazingly complex community. In her unique way she weaves a richly woven fabric of interrelationships, through a series of stories which are highly personal anecdotes, keenly observed with a subtle wit and lively, unsentimental, yet poignant vignettes about the people she meets in her work and play - and didn't those nurses know how to play, off duty, in war-time Britain!

Extract

There were strangers everywhere. Dutch and Poles, free French and soldiers or airmen from distant parts of the British Isles. Their boys were here and our boys had disappeared.